Fading Stars: Finding A Home For Our Former Superstars

By Ari McCoy ’17

Adrian Peterson: former MVP and 2015 NFL rushing yards leader. Jamaal Charles: the top rusher in Kansas City Chiefs history. LeGarrette Blount: last year’s rushing touchdowns leader and the top rusher for the Super Bowl Champion New England Patriots. All of these players share one thing in common: they are just over 30 and without a team.

Two years ago, Peterson and Charles were considered dominant backs who would be in high demand until their careers were finished. Even after previous injuries, both had bounced back for All-Pro level seasons. However, after two consecutive injury riddled seasons the past two years for both players, their markets have become barren. Peterson listed off potential teams of choice for the media, none of which have made an offer, while Charles sat by idly, waiting for teams to call his agent. With the main signing period passed, we are still waiting for our former MVP candidates to find homes.

Legarrette Blount has been a polarizing player since his college days, as a graduate of the highly publicized “Last Chance U” before finishing his collegiate career at Oregon and entering the draft. His incredible highlight plays have mixed with troubling off the field issues, including a marijuana scandal before the 2013 season that led to his release from the Steelers. But after multiple quality seasons with the New England Patriots since the incident, and no off the field issues, it is a surprise the Pro Bowler hasn’t received more, or any, interest.

There are a number of teams still needing a running back. Both the Patriots and New York Giants are still searching for a power back. Oakland only has two true backs on the roster, both entering their second year. Washington, Detroit and Green Bay all lack depth, power and experience, three traits the current market still has in spades.

 

Predictions:

Peterson heads to Green Bay and plays tandem to a younger player drafted in the middle rounds who can catch the ball out of the backfield. Two year deal worth $12 million with 7.5 guaranteed.

Charles waits it out until mid-July, where a team like the Giants or Redskins takes a chance with hope of a healthy season for a reduced workload Charles. One year deal $4 million, fully guaranteed if he makes the roster

Blount resigns with the Patriots soon before or after the draft to maintain a role similar to this past year in New England. One year $2.5 million with a $1 million potential maximum incentives bonus.

 

With those three off the table, that will most likely conclude the running back market unless Marshawn Lynch comes out of retirement, which appears unlikely at the moment. This year’s draft contains the best running back class in potentially the past decade. It will be interesting to see how the draft affects the veterans remaining on the market.

Why the Celtics can challenge the Cavaliers in the East

By  Jackson Daignault ’18

The Boston Celtics, no matter their level of success, have always been underappreciated. The rhetoric that the Celtics are overrated cause many to  believe the Celtics are not “enough” to actually contend in the East.

However, many seem to forget that the Celtics are currently in sole possession of the two seed, and have a very realistic chance to challenge the top dog in the east, the Cleveland Cavaliers. Yes, the Cavaliers are not full strength and have lost three of the last five, but that does not take away from the fact that they are the team to beat.

The Celtics’ prime position to dethrone the King of the East is best showcased by their March 1 victory over the Cavaliers in Boston.

The Celtics were able to defeat Lebron James’ Cavs, despite James’ triple double. The Celtics relied heavily on Isaiah Thomas, who finished with 31 points on 10-20 shooting. No sequence, however, defined the growth of the Celtics more than Avery Bradley’s lockdown defense on Kyrie Irving in the final minutes of the game. Throughout the entire game, the hard nosed defense of Bradley, along with Marcus Smart,  wreaked havoc on the Cavaliers backcourt without J.R. Smith.

This game proved that the Celtics are ready for the challenge of the Cavs. The Celtics have been plagued by injuries all year long, highlighted by Avery Bradley missing 18 games due to achilles injury. Now that the Celtics are finally 100 percent healthy, they are a force to be reckoned with.

The Celtics will only go as far as Isaiah Thomas will take them, the 5’9 point guard averaging 29.3 points per game. Thomas has been kryptonite for other teams this season, and is in the discussion for MVP. James himself called Thomas a “clear cut star,” and “a guy that you want on your team.” Thomas has absolutely lit it up this season, shooting 46 percent from the field. The Celtics will rely heavily on Thomas’ playmaking and scoring ability if they wish to challenge the Cavs in the East.

Although the Celtics were swept by the Cavaliers in the playoffs two years ago, this current team is a totally different animal.

The biggest offseason move for the Celtics was acquiring former Atlanta Hawks center Al Horford, a three time All-Star. Although Horford does not fill up the stat sheet, his overall affect on the game is apparent every time he steps onto the floor. Horford has a 16.9 player efficiency rating, second on the team. Horford is also one of the best passing big men in the league, averaging close to five assists per game. Horford is very versatile and will be able to match up with any of the Cavaliers’ big men, ranging from Kevin Love (barring he returns), to Tristan Thompson. Since Horford is able to play both the four and the five, he has the lateral quickness to keep up with almost any player on defense. The offense is often run through him when Isaiah is being heavily defended, and he has capitalized, averaging 14 points per game. The addition of Horford was huge for the Celtics, and with his positive impact on the game, they have a better chance at being able to challenge Lebron James and the Cavaliers.

The Celtics are a gritty, hard nosed team that the fans absolutely eat up. No two Celtics represent that grit more than Avery Bradley and Marcus Smart. The two are absolute fiends on the perimeter, and opposing guards have a hard time getting past them. The Celtics can match up defensively with almost any team in the East, especially the Cavaliers. Seen earlier, Avery Bradley absolutely ate Kyrie Irving alive on the defensive side of the ball in their March 1 showdown, and he can continue to do so the rest of the season.

With the acquisition of Horford, and the increased scoring from Thomas, the Celtics are a real threat to the Cavaliers’ status as the top dog in the East. The Celtics should no longer be doubted, but instead they should be credited as a real contender to dethrone the King.

Why Lebron James will win the 2017 NBA MVP

Jack Beck ’18

Lebron James is the best basketball player in the world.” That is a consensus statement in the National Basketball Association (NBA), where there is very little consensus on the trending issues.

Seeing that James is the best basketball player in the world, wouldn’t it make sense that everyone would view him as the league’s Most Valuable Player? This is not the case.

There are four MVP candidates being considered as the season comes to a close: Lebron James, Russell Westbrook, James Harden and Kawhi Leonard. In most seasons, any of these four players would have a strong case for the MVP trophy. But this isn’t most seasons.

This season you have one of the greatest NBA players of all time, Lebron James, having arguably his greatest season ever, yet still isn’t considered the MVP. He is being completely overlooked for this trophy. And yet James truly deserves this accolade more than any player and more than any other year of his career.

Consider James Harden, who is shooting nearly 10 full percentage points worse from the field than James — 44.3 percent to James’ 53.8 percent. James is also shooting a better percentage from the 3-point line — 39.8 percent to Harden’s 36 percent.

Russell Westbrook has been wildly less efficient than James, shooting 41.9 percent compared to James’s 53.8 percent. To give that some context, there are 57 players in the league averaging at least 13 field goal attempts this season. James is first in field goal percentage, Westbrook is 54th — fourth from the bottom.

When considering the last MVP Candidate, Kawhi Leonard, there really shouldn’t be a conversation. Leonard is a tremendous basketball player, but he’s simply not better than James at anything on the offensive end of the floor. James averages 2.2 more rebounds per game and an enormous 5.4 more assists per game than Leonard. James is fourth in the league in assists per game, while Leonard tied for 54th.

The final argument one might make for James not winning MVP would be “value.” What would happen if you took “Player X” off of his team? Advance stats provide the answer.

If you are going off of the numbers above, Harden and Leonard are disqualified immediately.

James and Westbrook both have a much higher net impact, with Westbrook accounting for 14.1 points per 100 possessions and James at 15.1. What tilts this in James’ favor even further is that he’s the difference between an excellent team and a terrible team, while Westbrook is the difference between a pretty good team and a terrible team.

James makes the Cleveland Cavaliers arguably the best and most talented team in the entire league. Without him, they are barely in consideration to make the playoffs. The Oklahoma City Thunder on the other hand, are just a mediocre team even with Westbrook, currently sitting as the sixth seed in the Western Conference.

LeBron James is universally accepted as the best player in the world. Typically, the universally accepted best player on the best team among the MVP contenders would be named MVP.

This year, that doesn’t appear to be the case. People are doing all they possibly can to convince themselves the MVP is someone other than James. They can certainly try, but numbers and common sense say otherwise.

The Truth Behind the Combine

By Ben Pearl ’18

Football is the sport that never stops. The 16 game regular season is merely a small portion of what the National Football League (NFL) truly is. Between training camp, preseason, playoffs, and the draft, the season never ceases. The never-ending cycle of the league was heightened even more with the addition of the National Invitational Camp (NIC) in 1982. This camp, held in Tampa, gave NFL draft prospects an opportunity to showcase their talents. Three years after its creation, the NIC was officially renamed the NFL Scouting Combine, and continues to go by this title today.

 

In the combine’s 35 year existence, some of history’s greatest athletes have performed at the venue, as around 330 players are invited annually. However, experts constantly debate if a correlation exists between a player’s 40-time, bench press reps, and vertical jump and how well they will perform at the professional level. In fact, some of the greatest players in NFL history had less than impressive statistics at the combine. Most notable is Tom Brady, who ran a 5.28 40-yard dash and had a 24.5 inch vertical jump among other testings. While these statistics contributed to his sixth round selection in the draft, no one can explain how someone who, on paper, has no athleticism could also win five Super Bowls. Another current NFL superstar who had an underwhelming combine performance is Pittsburgh Steelers wide receiver Antonio Brown. As a receiver, NFL teams were not impressed with his 4.57 40 time and his 6.98 three cone drill. Brown has overcome these measurables as he has posted three straight 1000 yard and 100 catch seasons. In addition to Brady and Brown, hundreds of other NFL players have proven that the combine does not show how well they can play.

 

In 2017, 17 running backs had faster 40 times than Le’veon Bell, 7 linebackers bench pressed more times than Von Miller, and 6 defensive backs recorded higher vertical leaps than Richard Sherman. However, these numbers will have no influence on whether these athletes become an all-pro or super bowl champion in five years. All that these testing times can do is give teams an idea of how athletic they are. In certain cases, a player’s combine can severely raise or lower their draft stock, but more often than not the combine is used to confirm what a team thinks about a prospect.

 

One of the biggest stories of this year’s combine was that John Ross, a wide receiver from the University of Washington, broke Chris Johnson’s eight-year 40-yard dash record with a time of 4.22 seconds. Four days after the combine concluded, CBS Sports released a post-combine mock draft in which Ross jumped nine spots solely based on his 40 time. According to NFL.com, 53 wide receivers have run the 40-yard dash in 4.40 seconds or faster since 2003. Only six of those 53 receivers have recorded at least one 1,000-yard receiving season. In that same span, 149 wide receivers have run a 40-yard dash slower than 4.60 seconds, and of those 149, eight have recorded a 1,000 yard receiving season.
After redshirting his junior year, Ross had a breakout season this past year with 1,150 receiving yards on 81 catches and 17 touchdowns. However, with the uncertainty of NFL success it is unclear whether Ross will be productive in his career. The main goal of the combine is for scouts to determine who has enough potential to be worth spending a draft pick, since each team usually has only around seven. Players must leave a lasting impression during their combine tests, as Ross did, if they want to be remembered on draft day.

Why Lebron James will win the 2017 NBA MVP

By Jack Beck ’18

Lebron James is the best basketball player in the world.” That is a consensus statement in the National Basketball Association (NBA), where there is very little consensus on the trending issues.

Seeing that James is the best basketball player in the world, wouldn’t it make sense that everyone would view him as the league’s Most Valuable Player? This is not the case.

There are four MVP candidates being considered as the season comes to a close: Lebron James, Russell Westbrook, James Harden and Kawhi Leonard. In most seasons, any of these four players would have a strong case for the MVP trophy. But this isn’t most seasons.

This season you have one of the greatest NBA players of all time, Lebron James, having arguably his greatest season ever, yet still isn’t considered the MVP. He is being completely overlooked for this trophy. And yet James truly deserves this accolade more than any player and more than any other year of his career.

Consider James Harden, who is shooting nearly 10 full percentage points worse from the field than James — 44.3 percent to James’ 53.8 percent. James is also shooting a better percentage from the 3-point line — 39.8 percent to Harden’s 36 percent.

Russell Westbrook has been wildly less efficient than James, shooting 41.9 percent compared to James’s 53.8 percent. To give that some context, there are 57 players in the league averaging at least 13 field goal attempts this season. James is first in field goal percentage, Westbrook is 54th — fourth from the bottom.

When considering the last MVP Candidate, Kawhi Leonard, there really shouldn’t be a conversation. Leonard is a tremendous basketball player, but he’s simply not better than James at anything on the offensive end of the floor. James averages 2.2 more rebounds per game and an enormous 5.4 more assists per game than Leonard. James is fourth in the league in assists per game, while Leonard tied for 54th.

The final argument one might make for James not winning MVP would be “value.” What would happen if you took “Player X” off of his team? Advance stats provide the answer.

If you are going off of the numbers above, Harden and Leonard are disqualified immediately.

James and Westbrook both have a much higher net impact, with Westbrook accounting for 14.1 points per 100 possessions and James at 15.1. What tilts this in James’ favor even further is that he’s the difference between an excellent team and a terrible team, while Westbrook is the difference between a pretty good team and a terrible team.

James makes the Cleveland Cavaliers arguably the best and most talented team in the entire league. Without him, they are barely in consideration to make the playoffs. The Oklahoma City Thunder on the other hand, are just a mediocre team even with Westbrook, currently sitting as the sixth seed in the Western Conference.

LeBron James is universally accepted as the best player in the world. Typically, the universally accepted best player on the best team among the MVP contenders would be named MVP.

This year, that doesn’t appear to be the case. People are doing all they possibly can to convince themselves the MVP is someone other than James. They can certainly try, but numbers and common sense say otherwise.

Why the Pelicans are not screwed

By Ari McCoy ’17

The Deal:

Sacramento Kings trade: Demarcus Cousins and Omri Casspi

New Orleans Pelicans trade: Guard Buddy Hield, ‎guard Tyreke Evans, guard Langston Galloway, New Orleans’ 2017 first-round pick and 2017 second-round pick (via the Sixers)

Background: The New Orleans Pelicans caught the NBA by surprise when they traded for All-Star center Demarcus Cousins from the Kings. Cousins’ name has been a mainstay in the NBA trade rumors for years, due to the instability of the Sacramento management and the immense projected haul. The Pelicans, however, have never been a projected suitor due to their lack of quality assets and publicly known interest. With a management team known for an aggressive win-now strategy, New Orleans pulled the trigger and appeared to steal away the All-NBA big. Giving up only one first round pick, one second round pick, and a few players, including struggling rookie Buddy Hield and former King Tyreke Evans, the NBA world was stunned at the lack of assets. But in the games since the trade, the team has struggled, going 0-3 before Cousins picked up a one game suspension due to being well past the league’s technical maximum. Many people are already beginning to say that the trade is a bust for NOLA. This is an overreaction.

Why NOLA shouldn’t worry yet: It’s been three games everyone, let’s relax. The team has struggled, going 0-3. In those three games, Cousins has averaged 23.3 points, 12.7 rebounds, 4.7 assists, 3.7 steals and 1.3 blocks. In one of those games he only played 21 minutes against an OKC team with one of the league’s better defensive centers in Steven Adams. In that game, Cousins registered a dominant stat line of 31 points and 10 rebounds, including going 15-15 from the free throw line, before fouling out. So while the team has struggled to win games, Cousins isn’t necessarily the issue. His star front court partner, Anthony Davis, has excelled next to him, scoring 29, 39 and 38 points in each game since the trade. The real focus should be on the dearth of talent around the star studded frontcourt. Point guard Jrue Holiday was once a good player, but injuries have made him less athletic and have created significant rust. Wings Solomon Hill and Hollis Thompson are both one dimensional players. Hill is a net zero player offensively, and Thompson doesn’t provide much more than his shooting as a spot up wing. The bench is devoid of talent, supported by borderline rotation and a few D League caliber players. It is understandable why this team went 0-3 versus three good teams.

Conclusion: While the team does have two star players in the frontcourt, they can’t be expected to be a dominant team, or even much better than a .500 team, with a supporting cast like this.

Marcus Smart; blue collar basketball player

By Jackson Daignault ’18

Boston, a city with 37 professional championships, is no stranger to success.

The Celtics, a franchise that holds the most NBA championships ever (17) and currently holds the record for most wins of all time, resides here.

The New England Patriots, who recently captured their fifth Super Bowl victory thanks to the never ending success of quarterback Tom Brady, primarily bases itself in Boston.

The Red Sox, who have nine World Series victories, three of which are in the last 15 years, play their games on Yawkey Way.

The moral of the story is that Boston is a successful city. The fans love watching their teams play, and the teams love being able to represent their Bostonian fans.

One recurring theme in Boston sports is the presence of an enforcer; a player who maintains the grit and grind that makes Boston fans go crazy.

The Celtics had Kevin Garnett; the Pats have Brady; the Red Sox had Jason Varitek. This current Celtics team has Marcus Smart, a third year guard from Oklahoma State University.

Smart may not be the best shooter; he may only be averaging 10 points per game. But there’s one thing that Smart does not lack: heart. Time after time, TD Garden is blessed with a Marcus Smart hustle play; or a ball saving move.

Smart has showcased the heart and desire that Boston fans thirst for. Smart puts on a show for Celtics fans, never letting them question his heart and desire to win games.

Smart has never allowed anyone to question his offense. Although he doesn’t fill the stat sheet night in and night out, Smart is a strong, downright crazy presence on the floor. The feats Smart will go to in order to win games are unparalleled.

Although many can make the argument that Jae Crowder could fit this bill, Smart has continued to be an energizer off the bench for them, and continues to fill his role: enforcer.

Smart is averaging nearly four rebounds a game, close to the top of the team leader boards, and the only guard, besides Avery Bradley, who is even in the top eight. Smart is willing to put his body on the line night after night in order to give his team the best chance to win.

Smart also makes a huge impact on the defensive side of the ball, where he has a +/- of +6.2  . Smart is considered to be one of the best on ball defenders in the league, and it shows with his career average of 1.5 steals per game.

Last season, the Celtics had a top 10 defense thanks in part to the never ending hustle of Marcus Smart. The Celtics made the playoffs, and although they were defeated in the first round by the Atlanta Hawks, they would not have been able to get there without the continuous heart of Smart, where he had 27 rebounds and 10 steals in six games. Smart made a big difference on the defensive ball for the Celtics, where he shadowed sharpshooter Kyle Korver. After a game four win against Atlanta, Isaiah Thomas praised Smart, saying “[Marcus Smart] is going to be a special player in this league.” Smart was also often asked to guard larger opponents, such as Paul Millsap, who he held to 1 for 5 shooting against him in game 4.

Although the Celtics ended up getting ousted in the first round, Smart was a hawk on defense and showed his heart to the city of Boston.

As much as can be said about Smart’s tremendous defense and ability to defend any position 1-4, Smart is still not an effective offensive player. Smart makes up for his lack of offense with stunning hustle and defense, but if he can pick it up on the offensive side of the ball, teams will start to respect him even more. Once Smart makes these offensive strides, Boston will embrace him even more.  

As Smart continues to mature on and off the court, his offensive game will eventually catch up to his ability to work hard. But for now, Smart has shown the Celtics, and the city of Boston, that he bleeds green.